Monday, 8 September 2014

Swanage Folk Festival

"We've only got Stonehenge left."
"I'll have a pint then, and glass of white wine please."
"We've got no white wine left."
"Don't suppose you have any rose?"
"Are you having a laugh?  We've never had any of that here!"

You've got to love the progressive attitude.  But picture the scene not 5 minutes later.  A third filled marquee and a mediocre band playing to a 'polite' seated audience that made me feel young again.  Along comes a woman with a badge on.
"Can you move out of the aisle please."
omg
"I'm sorry?"
"You can't stand there.  Health and Safety"

We left.

Turns out to be a good thing, 'cos john and I drifted into the Red Lion where we found a Pete.  Julian joined after a quick shanty alert was issued on all frequencies and we rattled off a few of our favourites to a packed pub that were quite happy to rattle the windows at one o'clock in the morning.

Arrrrggghhh




We popped back in on Sunday lunchtime too (with the Kelpettes), but it was predictably a much more muted affair that suited our hangovers and we didn't stay all that long.  But the matre'd did introduce us without prompting and I saw somebody nearly clap before we'd even started...

Wednesday, 3 September 2014

Swanage Folk Festival

What will be the highlights of Swanage Folk Festival, I wonder?

If it follows the form of years past, the open Irish music session in The White Swan will be great.  As will the open singing in the Red Lion at the same time.

Ahh the memories - last year not only did we sing alongside our greatest shanty influence 'Kimber's Men', but we also got fined by some guy who thought he was in charge of the session. 

There's a couple of terrific acts at Sandpit Field on Saturday night (which is why we're not singing on Saturday night):

{cue stolen words}
Joe Broughton, Paloma Trig├ís, Tom Chapman and Dan Walsh are The Urban Folk Quartet. Four highly accomplished musicians, a dozen instruments and four voices coming together to craft a knockout show of globally–influenced, electrifying acoustic music that has been taking the international folk scene by storm.
http://www.theufq.com
Twice-nominated at BBC Folk Awards, contemporary folk/acoustic duo Gilmore & Roberts combine award-winning songwriting with astounding lap-tapping guitar, fiery fiddle and their trademark harmonies, creating a powerful wall of sound.
http://www.gilmoreroberts.co.uk

But Kelp! (or at least some of us) will be singing in the Red Lion on Sunday lunchtime at whatever is left of the open singing community.  It'll be fun.

The Alabama

One of my own favourites, 'The Alabama' tells the story of a boat built in secrecy in 1862 to fight for the Confederates during the American Civil War.

When blocked from entering Cherbourg Port after 2 years at sea, the Captain of the Alabama sent the following telegraph:

"my intention is to fight the Kearsarge as soon as I can make the necessary arrangements. I hope these will not detain me more than until to-morrow or the morrow morning at farthest. I beg she will not depart until I am ready to go out. I have the honor to be Your obedient servant, R. Semmes, Captain."

When the Alabama’s keel was laid
Roll, Alabama, Roll
Twas laid in the yard of Jonathan Laird
O Roll, Alabama, Roll

Twas laid in the yard of Jonathan Laird
Roll, Alabama, Roll
Twas laid in the town of Birkenhead
O Roll, Alabama, Roll

Down the Mersey way she rolled then
Roll, Alabama, Roll
Liverpool fitted her with guns and men
O Roll, Alabama, Roll

From the Western Isle she sailed forth
Roll, Alabama, Roll
To destroy the commerce of the North
O Roll, Alabama, Roll

To Cherbourg port she sailed one day
Roll, Alabama, Roll
To take her count of prize money
O Roll, Alabama, Roll

Many a sailor lad he met his doom
Roll, Alabama, Roll
When the Kearsarge it hove in view
O Roll, Alabama, Roll

Til a shot from the forward canon that day
Roll, Alabama, Roll
Blew the Alabama’s stern away
O Roll, Alabama, Roll

Off the three mile limit in sixty-four
Roll, Alabama, Roll
The Alabama sank to the ocean floor
O Roll, Alabama, Roll